The Art of Simple Writing.

“One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.”

― Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

The purpose of every book is to be read. Yes, of every book. If you leave it on the shelf to collect dust, then it’s pretty much dead. A story is alive when there is someone to read it, so if we want to keep our book alive, we should keep the reader hooked to our story, thirsty to learn what happens next. There is a tendency for authors to use pompous expressions and ornate words to display their knowledge. This shows incompetence on the part of the author in being concise and expressing his thoughts in the best possible way.

Feelings usually do not require elaborate words and complex metaphors to be expressed. Love, sorrow, hatred, joy: with four words the writer can perfectly describe the emotional state of a character. It’s not the actual words that touch the reader’s heart, but rather the meaning of them. The right words are simple, they are those that sneak inside you and gradually unfold their meaning as you progress in the story. Do not fool yourself. It is much harder to get a complex meaning across with simple words and few paragraphs than to spread yourself thin in trying to write reams of pages of ornate, complicated language.

Hans Hofman said.  “The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.”

What would you prefer? To put your knowledge on display through complicated expressions and redundant details and force your reader to skip whole pages because they don’t understand what you’re writing, or to use simple words that together form a complex but understandable meaning? And the best part is that the readers will forge a bond with the character exactly because they can understand him. Simple is beautiful and, as a writer and reader, I try to keep it simple. The words, that is, not the meanings.

One thought on “The Art of Simple Writing.

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